can you freeze mushrooms

Unfrozen spores and musts (old-school shrooms) still work, and if you know ways to freeze them. These options ideally mentioned by *not a scientist*.
*** UPDATE*** Here’s a post from A Green Thumbs Up by Matthew Querin that apparently covers freezing any mushrooms: http:\/\/www.greenthumbsupblog.com\/how-do-i-freeze-mushrooms\/
From my nontechnical background, however, I’m guessing that freezing does nothing to preserve the life isn’t necessary for culinary purposes – it would be easier just not to cook them! (To each their own though.) And when thawed some varieties do taste less…well…great than fresh – for example both reishi (see the photo below) and the turkey tail look white but turn out to have a gelatinous interior \u2014 those are not really dried up at all but simply semi frozen again.
[More research needed.] There is an article aboutcan you freeze mushrooms, please watch it together. If you have any questions, remember to reply.

Why is water cold?

The temperature may be lower if supercooling occurs or if there are impurities present in the water which could cause freezing point depression to occur. Under certain conditions, water may remain a liquid as cold as -40 to -42°F!

What is the freezing point of water?

The freezing point or melting point of water is the temperature at which water changes phase from a liquid to a solid or vice versa. The freezing point describes the liquid to solid transition while the melting point is the temperature at which water goes from a solid (ice) to liquid water. …

Who is Dr. Helmenstine?

Dr. Helmenstine holds a Ph.D. in biomedical sciences and is a science writer, educator, and consultant. She has taught science courses at the high school, college, and graduate levels. What is the freezing point of water or the melting point of water? Are the freezing point and melting point the same?

Does water have a nucleus?

The answer is that water needs a seed crystal or other small particle (nucleus) on which to form crystals. While dust or impurities normally offer a nucleus, very pure water won’t crystallize until the structure of liquid water molecules approaches that of solid ice. Helmenstine, Anne Marie, Ph.D.

What is the difference between a freezing point and a melting point?

The freezing point describes the liquid to solid transition while the melting point is the temperature at which water goes from a solid (ice) to liquid water.